Laptops and Gadgets – The Blue-Ray Way

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Blue-ray, launched mid 2006, offers consumers an opportunity to watch higher definition movies and gives the movie enthusiast more reason to stay in all weekend tucked in with a bag of chips and the laptop.

Currently available as standalone drives or as drives on laptops and computers, Blue-ray is offered by over 200 of the world’s top consumer electronic companies. Dell for example, one of the first companies to become involved with Blue-ray, offers a laptop and desktop option. Blue-ray gets its name from the blue-violet laser used to read and write data on a disc. This laser is shorter than the red laser that DVD players use and is more precise, allowing data to be stored more tightly – five times as much as a DVD allows. Blue-ray is old news to the techno junkie, but we’ve by no means heard the last of it, and there are some interesting new developments in the pipeline.

Gadget releases

Panasonic’s DMP-B15 new portable Blue-ray player, launched this year, is the first portable Blue-ray player. The resolution is lower than what Blue-ray discs offer, but it is still markedly higher than that of a DVD player. Although not visually all that appealing, it is perfect for the seasoned traveller who enjoys the escapism that high-definition movies offer. It can also be connected to a big screen TV for those times spent at home.

The Blue-Ray Akoya 8610 Medion is the answer for you if you are looking for a home entertainment system come laptop – and it’s reasonably priced. You’ll forget it’s a computer when making use of the high resolution (1,680 x 945), 18.4-inch screen and Dolby surround sound system that is included.

Sony is on top of its game, and will be releasing the Vaio AR Premium in mid-January 2009. This notebook with 17 inch screen also has futuristic multimeda features, sporting the capacity to record high definition camcorder content to Blu-ray discs.

In a move to bring Blu-Ray to more households, Vizio is releasing the VBR100 Blu-ray player in the US which will cost under $200. Although it only has the bare basics, the price is bound to appeal to cash-strapped consumers.

Blue-ray is innovation in visual electronics at its best, revolutionising data storage and adding an extra dimension to visual media. Pioneer recently pushed the envelope even further, developing a prototype disk that can hold a phenomenal 500GB on 20 layers: a promise that we are just experiencing the tip of the Blue-ray ice-berg.



Source by Frances Van Den Berg

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